Leave the Bitter; Take the Sweet :: New Years PODCAST

Presented by Pastor Steve Shields on 12/31/2017 at Curwensville Alliance Church

New Year’s Eve has always been an odd thing to me.

There’s no real holiday to celebrate, as on Independence Day or Christmas. It’s just a seemingly arbitrary demarcation we use to count our trips around the sun.

However, there is wisdom in marking the passing of time. 

Part of that wisdom is a matter of looking back and looking forward. Something we tend to do at New Year’s. Something we should do consistently.

When you look back at your life, I am sure you see some memories that are less-than-happy. And I am sure you see others that are sweet. Which of these do you want to mark your life, going forward?

In this podcast, I discuss leaving the bitter behind and taking the sweet ahead with you — into the future.
– Pastor Steve

Play

What about these Longings I Have? :: PODCAST

Presented by Pastor Steve Shields at Curwensville Alliance on Palm Sunday – 4/9/2017

Millionaires seldom smile. That’s what Andrew Carnegie said.

Why?

It’s probably because we are longing for something more — something beyond this world.

This Palm Sunday podcast speaks of our longings and addresses finding some satisfaction to things we long for most.

Play

Coping with Great Loss :: PODCAST

Presented on 3/12/2017 by Pastor Steve Shields at Curwensville Alliance Church

Mary Ann was light of Bob’s life. He was that dad — the one who doted on his daughter, and seemed to come alive when she entered the room. And why not? She was beautiful, gracious, and bright. When she moved to another state, he was sorry she’d left, but excited about what her future would be like.

And then the unthinkable happened. Mary Ann became sick and died — in a very short period of time. Bob was devastated. He was never the same. What parent would be the same after burying a child. But for Bob, it was different. His loss defined him — so much so that years later, his wife would say, “Our daughter died, and Bob’s not himself,” to new people they would meet.

I don’t judge Bob. I feel for him. My heart aches for him — not just because of his loss, but because that loss came to define who he was.

Pain can do that.

Pain can define who we are. But does it have to? 

This podcast addresses that question.

Play